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Moving Towards User-Centered Government: Community Information Needs and Practices of Families

Carolyn Pang, Carman Neustaedter, Jason Procyk, Daniel Hawkins, Kate Hennessy
Conference Papers GI '15, Proceedings of the 41st Graphics Interface Conference, Pages 155-162

Abstract

Government organizations have begun to consider how to provide families with information about their communities, yet their current design strategies focus on providing any and all of their information. This makes it difficult for families to find what is relevant to them. To help address this problem, we conducted a diary and interview study to explore what community information families are actually interested in, how and when they acquire it, and what challenges they face in doing so. Results show that location-based information in their environments triggered people to want to know more about their community while time-based information helped people plan family activities. Family members also wanted to have information resurface at particular places and points in time to support face-to-face interactions. Our analysis suggests design opportunities to leverage the affordances of print and online media and the use of in-home technologies to support the interactions between family members. We also suggest considerations for location-based experiences within communities.

A Comparison of Visual and Textual City Portal Designs on Desktop and Mobile Interfaces

Carolyn Pang, Carman Neustaedter, Jason Procyk, Bernhard E. Riecke
Conference Papers GI '15, Proceedings of the 41st Graphics Interface Conference, Pages 211-218

Abstract

Cities have recently begun to focus on how digital technology can better inform and engage people through an online presence containing web portals for desktop computers and mobile devices. Yet we do not know whether common user interface design strategies apply to government portal design given their vast repositories of information for citizens of varying ages. This mixed-methods study compares the usability of desktop and mobile interfaces for two types of city portals, textual and visual, using the System Usability Scale, a standardized usability questionnaire. Using a set of twelve tasks, we evaluated three usability aspects of two city portals: effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. Our results suggest there was a main effect between textual and visual designs, with users rating the textual design on a mobile device higher than a visual design. From this, we suggest that responsive design may not be the best fit when designing city portals to be experienced for use on desktop and mobile devices.

Sharing Domestic Life through Long-Term Video Connections

Carman Neustaedter, Carolyn Pang, Azadeh Forghani, Erick Oduor, Serena Hillman, Tejinder K. Judge, Michael Massimi, Saul Greenberg
Journal Paper ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI), Volume 22, Issue 1, March 2015, Article No. 3, 29 Pages

Abstract

Video chat systems such as Skype, Google+ Hangouts, and FaceTime have been widely adopted by family members and friends to connect with one another over distance. We have conducted a corpus of studies that explore how various demographics make use of such video chat systems in which this usage moves beyond the paradigm of conversational support to one in which aspects of everyday life are shared over long periods of time, sometimes in an almost passive manner. We describe and reflect on studies of long-distance couples, teenagers, and major life events, along with design research focused on new video communication systems—the Family Window, Family Portals, and Perch—that explicitly support “always-on video” for awareness and communication. Overall, our findings show that people highly value long-term video connections and have appropriated them in a number of different ways. Designers of future video communication systems need to consider: ways of supporting the sharing of everyday life rather than just conversation, providing different design solutions for different locations and situations, providing appropriate audio control and feedback, and supporting expressions of intimacy over distance.

User Challenges and Successes with Mobile Payment Services in North America

Serena Hillman, Carman Neustaedter, Erick Oduor, Carolyn Pang
Conference Papers MobileHCI '14, Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices & Services, Pages 253-262

Abstract

Mobile payment services have recently emerged in North America where users pay for items using their smartphones. Yet we have little understanding of how people are making use of them and what successes and challenges they have experienced. As a result, we conducted a diary and interview study of user behaviors, motivations, and first impressions of mobile payment services in North America in order to understand how to best design for mobile payment experiences. Participants used a variety of services, including Google Wallet, Amazon Payments, LevelUp, Square and company apps geared towards payments (e.g., Starbucks). Our findings show that users experience challenges related to mental model development, pre-purchase anxiety and trust issues, despite enjoying the gamification, ease-of-use, and support for routine purchases with mobile payments. This suggests designing a better mobile payment experience through the incorporation of users' routines and behaviors, gamification and trust mechanism development.

Mobile Payment Systems in North America: User Challenges & Successes

Serena Hillman, Carman Neustaedter, Erick Oduor, Carolyn Pang
Conference Papers CHI EA '14, Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Pages 1909-1914

Abstract

As smartphones continue to increase in popularity in North America so too does the opportunity to expand their use and functionality. Our study looks at one of these new opportunities, Mobile Payment Services (MPS). This study investigates user behaviors, motivations and first impressions of MPS in Canada and the USA through interviews with veteran users and interviews and diaries with new users. Participants used a variety of MPS, including: Google Wallet, Amazon Payments, LevelUp, Square and company apps geared towards payments (e.g., Starbucks). Our preliminary findings are presented as user successes and challenges.

Studying and Designing Technology for Domestic Life: Lessons from Home

Serena Hillman, Azadeh Forghani, Carolyn Pang, Carman Neustaedter
Book Chapter Morgan Kaufmann | October 9, 2014 | ISBN-10: 0128005556
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Chapter 2: Interviews with Remote Participants

Conducting research and technology design for domestic life is by no means easy. Methods commonly used in the field of Human-Computer Interaction in settings like the workplace may not easily translate to the richness and complexity of domestic life.

This book documents new ways in which researchers are studying domestic life, as well as designing and evaluating technology in the home.

  • Discover new research methods for exploring family life and evaluating and designing domestic technology.
  • Learn about the challenges in designing for and studying domestic life from experts in the field.
  • Read researchers' candid stories about what works and what does not work in practice.

How Technology Supports Family Communication in Rural, Suburban, and Urban Kenya

Erick Oduor, Carman Neustaedter, Tejinder K. Judge, Kate Hennessy, Carolyn Pang, Serena Hillman
Conference Papers CHI '14, Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Pages 2705-2714

Abstract

Much ICTD research for sub-Saharan Africa has focused on how technology related interventions have aimed to incorporate marginalized communities towards global economic growth. Our work builds on this. We present results from an exploratory qualitative study on the family communication practices of family members who communicate both within and between rural, suburban, and urban settings in Kenya. Our findings reveal that family communication focuses on economic support, well-being, life advice, and everyday coordination of activities. We also outline social factors that affect family communication, including being an eldest child, having a widowed sibling, and having reduced access to technology because of gender, literacy, or one's financial situation. Lastly, we discuss new opportunities for technology design and articulate the challenges that designers will face if creating or deploying family communication technologies in Kenya.

The Reasons Behind Kenyan Family Communication Patterns

Erick Oduor, Carman Neustaedter, Kate Hennessy, Carolyn Pang, Serena Hillman
Conference Papers CHI EA '14, Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Pages 1909-1914

Abstract

In this paper we present results from an exploratory qualitative study on the family communication practices of family members in Kenya. We reveal that family communication focuses on economic support, well-being, life advice, and everyday coordination of activities. Lastly, we discuss new opportunities for technology design and articulate the challenges that designers will face if creating or deploying family communication technologies in Kenya.

Designing for a Digital City: Advancing the Online Presence for a Municipal Government

Carolyn Pang, Carman Neustaedter
Conference Papers GHC '14, Grace Hopper Celebration

Abstract

Generally, participants were concerned with the wealth of information contained with both government portals, on both desktop and mobile interfaces. Participants also expressed concern with the layout and structure of information, and indicated their frustration with the system’s design and usability. In prior work, Sauro & Lewis noted the average SUS score was 68 for over 500 studies that employed the SUS (2012). None of the interfaces evaluated during our study met this average, with the highest score of 61 attained by the visual design on the desktop interface. A mean SUS score of 33 for the visual design on the mobile interface reflects major concerns with the system’s usability.

Shared Geocaching Over Distance with Mobile Video Streaming

Jason Procyk, Carman Neustaedter, Carolyn Pang, Tejinder K. Judge
Conference Papers CSCW Companion '14, Proceedings of the Companion Publication of the 17th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing, Pages 293-296

Abstract

Shared geocaching is an outdoor activity where pairs of individuals geocache together but in different locations. Video streaming allows two players to see each remote person's view and converse during the activity. This allows players to help each other out while searching for geocaches. We envision that shared geocaching will provide a way for family or friends to share experiences together over distance where they are both participating in the same activity at the same time, only in different locations.

Exploring Video Streaming in Public Setings: Shared Geocaching over Distance Using Mobile Video Chat

Jason Procyk, Carman Neustaedter, Carolyn Pang, Anthony Tang, Tejinder K. Judge
Conference Papers CHI '14, Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Pages 2163-2172

Abstract

Our research explores the use of mobile video chat in public spaces by people participating in parallel experiences, where both a local and remote person are doing the same activity together at the same time. We prototyped a wearable video chat experience and had pairs of friends and family members participate in ‘shared geocaching’ over distance. Our results show that video streaming works best for navigation tasks but is more challenging to use for finegrained searching tasks. Video streaming also creates a very intimate experience with a remote partner, but this can lead to distraction from the ‘real world’ and even safety concerns. Overall, privacy concerns with streaming from a public space were not typically an issue; however, people tended to rely on assumptions of what were acceptable. The implications are that designers should consider appropriate feedback, user disembodiment, and asymmetry when designing for parallel experiences.

"Shared Joy is Double Joy": The Social Practices of User Networks within Group Shopping Sites

Serena Hillman, Carman Neustaedter, Carolyn Pang, Erick Oduor
Conference Papers CHI '13, Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Pages 2417-2426

Abstract

Group shopping sites are beginning to rise in popularity amongst eCommerce users. Yet we do not know how or why people are using such sites, and whether or not the design of group shopping sites map to the real shopping needs of end users. To address this, we describe an interview study that investigates the friendship networks of people who participate in group shopping sites (e.g., Groupon) with the goal of understanding how to best design for these experiences. Our results show that group shopping sites are predominently used to support social activities; that is, users do not use them first and foremost to find 'deals'. Instead, group shopping sites are used for planning group activities, extending and building friendships, and constructing one's social identity. Based on these findings, we suggest improved social network integration and impression management tools to improve user experience within group shopping sites.

Family Communication in Rural and Slum Regions of Kenya

Erick Oduor, Carman Neustaedter, Serena Hillman, Carolyn Pang
Conference Papers CHI EA '13, Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Pages 847-852

Abstract

We report the findings of a small scale exploratory qualitative study on 13 participants from rural and slum regions of Kenya communicated with remote family members using technology. We focus on communication practices that enabled family members to support economic sustenance activities and also investigate the social aspects of using technology to provide or receive moral, emotional or other forms of support from distributed family members.

Technology Preferences and Routines for Distributed Families Coping with a Chronic Illness

Carolyn Pang
Thesis School of Interactive Arts & Technology, Simon Fraser University, April 2013

Abstract

Most family members want to stay aware of each other’s activities on an ongoing basis to maintain a sense of connectedness. In situations where a family member is ill, the desire to stay connected increases, as many families face the challenges of coping with the diagnosis and treatment of a chronic illness. Previous research has evaluated technologies designed to support patients and caregivers with personal health information management and sharing. However, we still do not have a detailed understanding of which technologies are preferred and what challenges people still face when sharing information with them. To address this problem, this thesis reports on a mixed-method study that explores technology preferences and health information sharing routines of distributed families coping with a chronic illness. The aim of these studies was to explore the nuances of technology selection and usage in such situations. The findings illustrate the reasons why people choose certain technologies over others, the ways in which they use them, and the challenges they face. Findings also point to the need for tools that mediate sharing health information across distance and age gaps, with consideration to respecting patient privacy and supportive roles while sharing such information.

Technology Preferences and Routines for Sharing Health Information during the Treatment of a Chronic Illness

Carolyn Pang, Carman Neustaedter, Bernhard E. Riecke, Erick Oduor, Serena Hillman
Conference Papers CHI '13, Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Pages 1759-1768

Abstract

When a patient has a chronic illness, such as heart disease or cancer, it can be challenging for distributed family members to stay aware of the patient's health status. A variety of technologies are available to support health information sharing (e.g., phone, video chat, social media), yet we still do not have a detailed understanding of which technologies are preferred and what challenges people still face when sharing information with them. To explore this, we conducted a mixed-method study-involving a survey and in-depth interviews--with people about their health information sharing routines and preferences for different technologies. Regardless of physical distance between distributed family members, synchronous methods of communication afforded the opportunity to provide affective support while asynchronous methods of communication were deemed to be the least intrusive. With family members adopting certain roles during the treatment of chronic illnesses, our findings suggest the need to design tools that mediate sharing health information across distance and age gaps, with consideration to respecting patient privacy while sharing health information.