Research Summary

In the past few years, we’ve seen a remarkable increase in the quantity, sophistication and usefulness of mobile and Web e-government apps at the local level. We’ve also seen rapid growth of investments in “civic tech” and the resulting burst of local government application startups, entrepreneurs and electronically engaged citizens.

Government organizations at all levels (local, provincial, and federal) are exploring ways in which access to digital government information can improve relationships between citizens through enhanced and efficient delivery of online services. O’Reilly (2010) describes the concept of Government 2.0 as occurring when government leaders recognize the opportunities Web 2.0 technologies (such as social media, cloud computing, crowdsourcing, and mobile apps) provide to better solve collective problems within communities. Walser (2012) introduces Government 2.0 as the movement towards making government more transparent (by publishing government data) and participatory (by inviting citizens to offer solutions to challenges). In short, Gov 2.0 is described as the technologies that enable citizens to participate in government.

Interests

  • Digital Government
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Domestic Computing
  • Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
  • Interaction Design

Connections Lab: Our Research Group

Dr. Erick Oduor

Researcher, IBM Research Africa

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Dr. Serena Hillman

UX Researcher, Electronic Arts

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Dr. Carman Neustaedter

Director, Connections Lab

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Jason Procyk, MSc, BSc, BA

UX Researcher, Electronic Arts

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Dan Hawkins, MSc, BSc

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Azadeh Forghani, MSc, BSc

PhD Candidate

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Collaborators

The Connections Lab (cLab) is a research group, led by Dr. Carman Neustaedter at Simon Fraser University’s School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT). Our group specializes in the areas of human-computer interaction, domestic computing, interaction design, and computer-supported cooperative work. We study the design and use of technologies aimed at supporting the everyday activities of families.

Many of our research projects focus on the study and design of family communication systems and pervasive games for families. Our broader research in human-computer interaction explores leisure activities, mobile commerce, workplace collaboration, health information sharing, and location-based games.