In the past few years, we’ve seen a remarkable increase in the quantity, sophistication and usefulness of digital initiatives within government organizations. We’ve also seen rapid growth of investments in “civic tech” and the resulting burst of local government application startups, entrepreneurs and electronically engaged citizens.

My doctoral research focuses on exploring the facets of family life that involves community awareness and routine travel via public transit in metropolitan cities. Community is a broad term for a variety of social arrangements, including community of practice, community of interest, social communities (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, etc.), and neighbourhood communities (Carroll & Rosson, 2013). My research explores neighbourhood communities, from the perspective of family life and understanding the impacts that awareness of community information has on shaping family communication and activities.

Interests

  • Digital Government
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Domestic Computing
  • Computer-Supported Cooperative Work

Connections Lab: Our Research Group

Dr. Erick Oduor

Research Scientist

IBM Research Africa
+ Visit

Dr. Serena Hillman

Senior UX Researcher

SMART Technologies
+ Visit

Dr. Carman Neustaedter

Associate Professor + Director

SFU + Connections Lab
+ Visit

Jason Procyk, MSc, BSc, BA

Senior Games Researcher

Electronic Arts Games

Azadeh Forghani, MSc, BSc

PhD Candidate

Simon Fraser University
+ Visit

Collaborators

The Connections Lab (cLab) is a research group, led by Dr. Carman Neustaedter at Simon Fraser University’s School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT). Our group specializes in the areas of human-computer interaction, domestic computing, interaction design, and computer-supported cooperative work. We study the design and use of technologies aimed at supporting the everyday activities of families.

Many of our research projects focus on the study and design of family communication systems and pervasive games for families. Our broader research in human-computer interaction explores leisure activities, mobile commerce, workplace collaboration, health information sharing, and location-based games.